Crate Club (US)
Crate Club (US)

Australian SAS Committed War Crimes, Internal Report Finds

Email sent: Nov 21, 2020 2:01pm
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SOFREP

Today's Situation Report

Saturday, October 21st, 2020

Hey, readers.

I'm Jacob Sotak, Editor-in-Chief of SOFREP, and here's what we got in today's SITREP.

AUSTRALIAN SAS COMMITTED WAR CRIMES, INTERNAL REPORT FINDS

A four-year inquiry into the Australian Special Forces’ SAS Regiment has found that at least 39 Afghan civilians were unlawfully killed by operators in 23 different incidents.

When the Australian SAS withdrew from Uruzgan province in Afghanistan in 2015, reports began filtering out that they had been involved in several shootings of unarmed civilians or farmers. 

General Angus Campbell, the then-chief of the army, requested the inspector general of the Australian Defense Forces (IGADF) to conduct an inquiry into “unsubstantiated stories” of illegal killings, inhumane and unlawful treatment of detainees, and a sense of entitlement developed over a lengthy period of time.

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A NAVY SEAL’S 5 MOST IMPORTANT LEADERSHIP TASKS

In the intense, high-stress environments U.S. Navy SEALs operate in, good leadership is essential for mission accomplishment and even survival.

Whether you are a light infantry platoon leader in the U.S. Army, a senior enlisted squad leader in the U.S. Marines, or the fire officer in charge of a four-person fire engine in some medium-sized midwestern American city, you have a substantial weight of responsibility proverbially pressing down on your shoulders. Someone, somewhere — for reasons hopefully not unbeknownst to you — has deemed that you are competent enough to lead a small operational unit or element within one of the military branches, a municipal or wildland fire department, or any number of other similar organizations.

If you are at all a conscientious leader, and most that have reached such a position likely ARE to at least some degree, then when the tones drop, or the balloon goes up, or the FRAGO arrives, you immediately start thinking to yourself, “okay, what do we need to do here?” Operating guidelines, rules of engagement, standard operating procedures, or tactics, techniques, and procedures (TTPs) start to crowd into your brain while you simultaneously prepare your individual gear and equipment.

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The Military Wife: A Heart of A Hero Novel

A young widow embraces a second chance at life when she reconnects with those who understand the sacrifices made by American soldiers and their families in award-winning author Laura Trentham’s The Military Wife.

Get a Copy

SOFREP RADIO - EPISODE 540

KEVIN MAURER, JOURNALIST AND AUTHOR OF ‘ROCK FORCE’

This week we rolled back the clock with journalist and author Kevin Maurer as we talk about his most recent book Rock Force: The American Paratroopers Who Took Back Corregidor and Exacted MacArthur’s Revenge on Japan.

Kevin Maurer is a very experienced author. He spent time embedded with Special Forces operators in Afghanistan and with the 82nd Airborne. He also co-wrote the book No Easy Day with Navy SEAL Mark Owen that recounts the raid that took out Osama bin Laden. So, he knows how to tell a military story.

Listen Now

Q4 SWEEPSTAKES LEADERS

Enter the Sweepstakes

NOVEMBER 21, 1970, US GREEN BERETS RAID SON TAY PRISON OUTSIDE OF HANOI

By mid-November 1970, there were 450 known American POWs in Vietnam, and more than double that amount reported as missing in action. Reports were surfacing of brutal conditions, torture, and starvation of American POWs.

Operation Ivory Coast was a daring rescue mission conducted by U.S. Army Green Berets, flown in by Air Force Commandos, to rescue the POWs at a small prisoner of war camp at Son Tay, 23 miles west of Hanoi. The raid was commanded by Colonel Arthur “Bull” Simons and 56 specially selected Green Berets who had trained for the mission.

The mission was deemed a failure. Unknown to the raiders, rains had flooded the Son Tay prison just prior to the raid, forcing the Vietnamese guards to move the POWs to another location. The prisoners who had been moved just a few miles down the road, watched the raid unfold.

However, the raid was viewed as a success by many in the U.S. military, as the Special Forces troops killed over 50 guards and took the compound while suffering two very minor casualties. And the Air Force was able to fly them in and out through one of the most heavily defended air spaces on earth at that time.

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Please visit the Loadout Room for all your SOFREP and Spec Ops merch, and support our content creation and veteran journalism. Thanks for being a subscriber!

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