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YOUR WEEKLY ESCAPE: What do the world's happiest places have in common?

Email sent: May 21, 2020 7:15pm

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Plus: Amazing photos of a 99-million-year-old bird, people who live in ancient caves, and pampered cats  ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌  ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌  ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌  ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌  ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌  ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌  ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌  ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌  ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌  ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌  ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌    ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌  ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌  ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌  ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌  ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌  ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌  ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌  ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌  ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌  ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌  ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌  
 
THE SEARCH FOR LIFE BEYOND EARTH VIEW ONLINE
National Geographic
Your Weekly Escape
Extraordinary people, discoveries, and places in a time of turmoil
Take a deep breath. In this crazy time, there are still amazing tales of purpose and dedication, exploration that leads to discovery and understanding, and a natural world that often astounds us. Here are a few of those stories:
PHOTOGRAPH BY MING BAI, CHINESE ACADEMY OF SCIENCES
You're looking at a 99-million-year-old bird
The remarkable hatchling, fossilized in a three-inch piece of amber, lived among dinosaurs during the Cretaceous Period. It was the most complete specimen of its kind ever found—scientists could even make out the colors of its feathers.
SEE MORE PHOTOS
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PHOTOGRAPH BY CORY RICHARDS
What we can learn from the world's happiest places
Their people feel secure, have a sense of purpose, and enjoy lives that minimize stress and maximize joy. Here’s how they do it.
SUBSCRIBER EXCLUSIVE
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PHOTOGRAPH BY ERIC GUTH
See eerie ice caves carved from the fiery breath of a volcano
After the 1980 eruption of Mount St. Helens, a glacier formed in the shadows inside the crater. Scientists—and our photographer—have explored its icy depths.
DIVE IN!
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PHOTOGRAPH BY GERHARD HÜDEPOHL, ESO
Life probably exists beyond Earth. So how do we find it?
With next-generation telescopes, tiny space probes, and more, scientists aim to search for life beyond our solar system—and make contact.
SUBSCRIBER EXCLUSIVE
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QUOTE
So the question of independence
May be a lifelong staggering trip
If life is fluid, while others flow
I’m happy to drip, drip, drip.
Tito Rajarshi Mukhopadhyay

Poet; author of "How Can I Talk If My Lips Don’t Move"; from "Outside the Lines"
PHOTOGRAPH BY TAMARA MERINO
Thousands of people call these ancient Spanish caves home
They've served as a sanctuary from wild storms, predatory animals, and religious and racial persecution. Now, they are home to communities who have eschewed modern life for the peaceful solitude of the mountains.
TAKE A PEEK
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PHOTOGRAPH BY DIANE COOK AND LEN JENSHEL
How even thinking about distant travel, even now, helps us
Looking ahead to your next adventure could benefit your mental health. Even if you’re not sure when that adventure will be.
READ ON
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PHOTOGRAPH BY WILLARD CULVER, NAT GEO IMAGE COLLECTION
Vintage photos of pampered cats
These aren't just photos of cute cats. Published in 1938 in National Geographic magazine, these images were also groundbreaking for their use of synchronized photoflash.
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Need a distraction?
DRAW: Anyone can do it. Learn how in 6 easy steps (NYT)  ››
WATCH: Thanks to the lockdown, these turtles are crossing a beach in the daytime (Reuters)  ››
This newsletter was edited and curated by Janey Adams and David Beard. Sign up here to receive Your Weekly Escape and/or our daily newsletters—covering History, Travel, Science, Animals, and Photography news. See you next week. Blue skies, green lights!
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