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Today's Headlines: Mnuchin and Powell Warn of Economic Scarring, and Offer Divergent Solutions

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Wednesday, May 20, 2020

Top News

Mnuchin and Powell Warn of Economic Scarring, and Offer Divergent Solutions

Mnuchin and Powell Warn of Economic Scarring, and Offer Divergent Solutions

By ALAN RAPPEPORT and JEANNA SMIALEK

The Treasury secretary and Fed chair said economic damage could last. One prescribed rapid reopening, the other robust policy action.

Fever Checks and Quarantine Dorms: The Fall College Experience?

Fever Checks and Quarantine Dorms: The Fall College Experience?

By ANEMONA HARTOCOLLIS

We listened as University of Kentucky administrators discussed bringing students back to campus, providing a glimpse into what other schools might do in the fall.

W.H.O. Members Reject Trump’s Demands but Agree to Study Its Virus Response

W.H.O. Members Reject Trump’s Demands but Agree to Study Its Virus Response

By MICHAEL D. SHEAR and ANDREW JACOBS

The outcome left the United States isolated as officials from China, Russia and the European Union chided Mr. Trump over his heated threats.

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Editors' Picks

‘Way Too Late’: Inside Amazon’s Biggest Outbreak

Technology

‘Way Too Late’: Inside Amazon’s Biggest Outbreak

By KAREN WEISE

A warehouse in the foothills of the Poconos has had more known Covid-19 cases than any of Amazon’s others after missing early opportunities to protect workers.

Why Did Mike Pompeo Want His Watchdog Fired?

Opinion

Why Did Mike Pompeo Want His Watchdog Fired?

By MICHELLE COTTLE

His vague explanations for asking President Trump to dismiss the State Department’s inspector general don’t add up.

World

One Crisis Too Many: How the Coronavirus Pushed Germany to Shift Course

News Analysis

One Crisis Too Many: How the Coronavirus Pushed Germany to Shift Course

By STEVEN ERLANGER

Some may not like it back home, but in the twilight of her career, Angela Merkel joined with France to try to save the European Union.

Raids Reveal Massive Fentanyl Production in Myanmar

Raids Reveal Massive Fentanyl Production in Myanmar

By HANNAH BEECH and SAW NANG

China’s crackdown on makers of the drug, which has fueled the U.S. opioid crisis, may have simply created opportunities for crime syndicates elsewhere.

Right to Privacy Extends to Foreign Internet Users, German Court Rules

Right to Privacy Extends to Foreign Internet Users, German Court Rules

By MELISSA EDDY

The intelligence services cannot randomly search the digital data of citizens of other countries living abroad, judges said, in a decision welcomed by civil rights activists.

For more world news, go to NYTimes.com/World »

U.S.

Pompeo Declined Interview Request From Inspector General About Saudi Arms Sales

Pompeo Declined Interview Request From Inspector General About Saudi Arms Sales

By EDWARD WONG and DAVID E. SANGER

The secretary of state instead offered written answers. He was aware of the inquiry and the specific lines of questioning about his decision to resume the sales.

Roe v. Wade Plaintiff Was Paid to Switch Sides, Documentary Says

Roe v. Wade Plaintiff Was Paid to Switch Sides, Documentary Says

By JENNY GROSS and AIMEE ORTIZ

Before dying in 2017, Norma McCorvey said she had supported anti-abortion groups only for the money.

What to Know About the Malaria Drug Trump Says He Is Using

What to Know About the Malaria Drug Trump Says He Is Using

By DENISE GRADY, KATIE THOMAS, PATRICK J. LYONS and NEIL VIGDOR

Here are the facts on hydroxychloroquine, which the president has promoted to fight Covid-19 despite warnings from the F.D.A. that it can cause heart problems.

For more U.S. news, go to NYTimes.com/US »
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Politics

Emulating Democrats, G.O.P. Ties House Hopes to Diverse Recruits

Emulating Democrats, G.O.P. Ties House Hopes to Diverse Recruits

By CATIE EDMONDSON

“We need candidates other than boring old white people”: House Republicans are betting on a group of diverse candidates with compelling biographies to help them reclaim lost seats.

Biden Calls Out ‘Anti-Semitism’ on the Left and Criticizes Israeli Policies

Biden Calls Out ‘Anti-Semitism’ on the Left and Criticizes Israeli Policies

By SHANE GOLDMACHER

“Criticism of Israel’s policy is not anti-Semitism,” the former vice president told donors. “But too often that criticism from the left morphs into anti-Semitism.”

The End of ‘Who Me? For V.P.?’ Politics

Political Memo

The End of ‘Who Me? For V.P.?’ Politics

By MARK LEIBOVICH

Maybe now people can actually admit their ambitions.

For more political news, go to NYTimes.com/Politics »
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Business

Johnson & Johnson to End Talc-Based Baby Powder Sales in North America

Johnson & Johnson to End Talc-Based Baby Powder Sales in North America

By TIFFANY HSU and RONI CARYN RABIN

The company has faced thousands of lawsuits from cancer patients who claim that its talc was contaminated with asbestos, a known carcinogen, and that the company knew of the risks.

Air Travel Surges by 123%! (Beware of Misleading Data Like That)

Air Travel Surges by 123%! (Beware of Misleading Data Like That)

By NEIL IRWIN

In normal times, percentage change is a helpful guide to what’s happening in the economy. But these are not normal times.

At Fox News, Mixed Message on Malaria Drug: ‘Very Safe’ vs. ‘It Will Kill You’

At Fox News, Mixed Message on Malaria Drug: ‘Very Safe’ vs. ‘It Will Kill You’

By MICHAEL M. GRYNBAUM

For two days running, Neil Cavuto has warned that a drug taken by President Trump, hydroxychloroquine, carries risks. Some of his colleagues disagree.

For more business news, go to NYTimes.com/Business »

Technology

U.S. Is Using Taiwan as a Pressure Point in Tech Fight With China

U.S. Is Using Taiwan as a Pressure Point in Tech Fight With China

By ANA SWANSON, PAUL MOZUR and RAYMOND ZHONG

The Trump administration is challenging Chinese access to Taiwan’s high-tech supply chain — and, by extension, Beijing’s influence over the island it claims as its territory.

A City Locks Down to Fight Coronavirus, but Robots Come and Go

A City Locks Down to Fight Coronavirus, but Robots Come and Go

By CADE METZ and ERIN GRIFFITH

Like many other places, a community 50 miles outside London went into quarantine. A fleet of delivery robots has been helping with the groceries.

The Hot New Thing in Clubby Silicon Valley? An App Called Clubhouse

The Hot New Thing in Clubby Silicon Valley? An App Called Clubhouse

By ERIN GRIFFITH and TAYLOR LORENZ

For all the high-minded talk among techies, their new favorite app is an invite-only (so far) social network for mingling with one another.

For more technology news, go to NYTimes.com/Technology »

Sports

Belmont Stakes to Run June 20 as First Leg of Triple Crown

Belmont Stakes to Run June 20 as First Leg of Triple Crown

By JOE DRAPE

The horse race that usually goes last in a bid for the Triple Crown plans to run close to its usual date at a shorter distance and without spectators.

N.F.L. Team Owners Enhance Rooney Rule, but Stop Short of Incentives

N.F.L. Team Owners Enhance Rooney Rule, but Stop Short of Incentives

By KEN BELSON

Tuesday’s vote will prevent teams from blocking assistant coaches and executives who plan to interview for new jobs. But team owners tabled a measure to upgrade the draft status of franchises that hire nonwhite candidates for leadership positions.

He Had Picked the Last Day of His Career. Now It May Never Come.

On Soccer

He Had Picked the Last Day of His Career. Now It May Never Come.

By RORY SMITH

The Spanish striker Aritz Aduriz seemed to have been given the perfect way to say goodbye to his 20-year career. Then the pandemic struck, and now he may just fade to black.

For more sports news, go to NYTimes.com/Sports »

Arts

America’s First Concert in Months Rocks an Arkansas Stage

America’s First Concert in Months Rocks an Arkansas Stage

By BRET SCHULTE

Fans who had to have their temperatures taken and wear masks for the Travis McCready show said it was worth it for the experience of hearing live music again.

Life Is More Like a Simulation. On These Shows, So Is Death.

Critic’s Notebook

Life Is More Like a Simulation. On These Shows, So Is Death.

By JAMES PONIEWOZIK

As viewers shelter with screens from the pandemic, more and more TV wrestles with mortality within digital reproductions.

With Movie Theaters Closed, Marquees Go Viral

With Movie Theaters Closed, Marquees Go Viral

By JULIA CARMEL

As businesses across the country remain shuttered, movie theater marquees offer jokes and advice to those wandering by.

For more arts news, go to NYTimes.com/Arts »

New York

Virus Raged at City Jails, Leaving 1,259 Guards Infected and 6 Dead

Virus Raged at City Jails, Leaving 1,259 Guards Infected and 6 Dead

By JAN RANSOM

Correction officers in New York City live in fear of bringing the virus home to families. They say the city has not protected them.

These N.Y.C. Neighborhoods Have the Highest Rates of Virus Deaths

These N.Y.C. Neighborhoods Have the Highest Rates of Virus Deaths

By MICHAEL SCHWIRTZ and LINDSEY ROGERS COOK

Race and income are the key factors that decide who dies from Covid-19 and who survives, city data shows.

She Spent Her Last Month of College Lifting Bodies in a Morgue

She Spent Her Last Month of College Lifting Bodies in a Morgue

By NICOLE HONG

After her campus closed, a college senior took a job as a temporary morgue worker on the front lines of the pandemic.

For more New York news, go to NYTimes.com/NewYork »

Food

The New Face of Restaurant Hospitality Wears a Mask

The New Face of Restaurant Hospitality Wears a Mask

By KIM SEVERSON

As dining rooms slowly reopen, owners are scrambling to reduce risks and reassure customers with an array of gear. Face coverings lead the way.

Is It Safe to Go Out to Eat?

Is It Safe to Go Out to Eat?

By PETE WELLS

Dining rooms are reopening in many states, but that doesn’t mean you should go. Before you decide, public health experts advise taking these steps.

Let Vegetables Be the Star of Your Memorial Day

A Good Appetite

Let Vegetables Be the Star of Your Memorial Day

By MELISSA CLARK

Finished with creamy burrata and a sweet and tangy agrodolce sauce, this packed platter makes a glorious holiday meal.

For more food news, go to NYTimes.com/Food »

Science

Amid Hydroxychloroquine Uproar, Real Studies of Drug Are Suffering

Amid Hydroxychloroquine Uproar, Real Studies of Drug Are Suffering

By SHERYL GAY STOLBERG

The political fights around a malaria drug that President Trump says he takes daily have impeded studies into whether it works to prevent coronavirus infection or treat Covid-19 early.

A.C.L.U. Warns Against Fever-Screening Tools for Coronavirus

A.C.L.U. Warns Against Fever-Screening Tools for Coronavirus

By NATASHA SINGER

A report by the civil liberties group contends that reliance on thermal cameras and temperature-sensing guns to resume work at factories and offices and to encourage travel is flawed and intrusive.

A New Viral Outbreak Is Killing Rabbits

A New Viral Outbreak Is Killing Rabbits

By JAMES GORMAN

This virus is deadly, long-lived and highly contagious, but it doesn’t affect people or other animals.

For more science news, go to NYTimes.com/Science »

Obituaries

Annie Glenn, Champion of Those With Speech Disorders, Dies at 100

those we’ve lost

Annie Glenn, Champion of Those With Speech Disorders, Dies at 100

By NEIL GENZLINGER

Being an astronaut’s wife thrust her into the spotlight, but a stutter left her struggling for words until she found help.

Nick Kotz, Crusading Journalist and Author, Dies at 87

Nick Kotz, Crusading Journalist and Author, Dies at 87

By SAM ROBERTS

He won a Pulitzer Prize for exposing unsafe conditions in meatpacking plants. He also wrote about hunger in America and the politics of the B-1 bomber.

Cécile Rol-Tanguy, French Resistance Fighter, Dies at 101

Cécile Rol-Tanguy, French Resistance Fighter, Dies at 101

By EVA MBENGUE

Passing through Nazi checkpoints in disguise, she carried machine guns and hand grenades to members of the underground.

Peter Brancazio, Who Explored the Physics of Sports, Dies at 81

Those We’ve Lost

Peter Brancazio, Who Explored the Physics of Sports, Dies at 81

By RICHARD SANDOMIR

He used science to demystify the myths of rising fastballs and Michael Jordan’s seemingly long hang time. He died of complications of the novel coronavirus.

Louis Delsarte, a Muralist of the Black Experience, Dies at 75

Louis Delsarte, a Muralist of the Black Experience, Dies at 75

By STEVEN KURUTZ

His paintings and murals rendered the Harlem Renaissance, Martin Luther King Jr. and his Brooklyn neighbors in stunning color.

Yu Lihua, 90, Dies; Writer Spoke to ‘Rootless’ Chinese Émigrés

Those we’ve lost

Yu Lihua, 90, Dies; Writer Spoke to ‘Rootless’ Chinese Émigrés

By AMY QIN

In her fiction she depicted “the struggle of Chinese immigrants in American society” — not the “Oriental exoticism” preferred by many publishers in the ’60s.

Michael McCaskey, Bears’ Boss in Their Glory Years, Dies at 76

Michael McCaskey, Bears’ Boss in Their Glory Years, Dies at 76

By KEN BELSON

He was a business professor when he took the reins from his grandfather George Halas, then led the team as it flourished in the 1980s, winning a Super Bowl.

For more Obituaries, go to NYTimes.com/Obituaries »

Opinion

Twitter Could End the Office as We Know It

Twitter Could End the Office as We Know It

By MARGARET O’MARA

This is the company’s most disruptive move yet.

Strange Things Happen When You Spend a Couple of Months in Lockdown

The Conversation

Strange Things Happen When You Spend a Couple of Months in Lockdown

By GAIL COLLINS and BRET STEPHENS

“You can’t only think the Swedes are smart when it comes to pandemics.”

The Right of the People to Protest Lockdown

The Right of the People to Protest Lockdown

By FLOYD ABRAMS and JOHN LANGFORD

Although some states have tried to ban them, anti-lockdown demonstrations are protected by the First Amendment.

For more Opinion, go to NYTimes.com/Opinion »
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