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Today's Headlines: Trump Sidesteps Question on Mueller Interview

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Top News
President Trump spoke to reporters in the East Room during a news conference with Prime Minister Erna Solberg of Norway.
Trump Sidesteps Question on Mueller Interview

By JULIE HIRSCHFELD DAVIS and NICHOLAS FANDOS

The response was a marked change from June, when President Trump said he would be "100 percent" willing to give a sworn statement to the special counsel.

House Republicans' Hard-line Immigration Stand Clashes With Trump Overture

By THOMAS KAPLAN and SHERYL GAY STOLBERG

A new proposal from House Republicans underscored how deep the divisions are between and within the two parties on immigration - just days before a deadline for a deal.

A breakfast for junior economists at an annual economic meeting in Philadelphia last week.
Wielding Data, Women Force a Reckoning Over Bias in the Economics Field

By JIM TANKERSLEY and NOAM SCHEIBER

Longstanding complaints about the barriers women face in the economics profession are beginning to resonate within the male-dominated field.

For more top news, go to NYTimes.com
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Editors' Picks
Rebecca Ribeiro with her son, Max

HEALTH

What if CHIP Funds Run Out? Here's What 6 Families Would Do

By FAHIMA HAQUE

With Congress yet to agree on a long-term plan to pay for the popular children's health insurance program, parents start thinking about contingency plans.

Steve Bannon at a Trump campaign event in New Hampshire in 2016.

OPINION | Op-Ed Contributor

Inside Steve Bannon's 'Fight Club'

By KURT BARDELLA

He didn't regard Breitbart as platform to inform the public, but as his weapon in a war against the establishment.

QUOTATION OF THE DAY

"It's like watching a telenovela. Every day is different. Now we're just going to the stressful part of the telenovela where you wonder what will happen to the protagonist."

FRANCIS MADI, 28, who who was brought to the United States from Venezuela in 2003 on the tension she and other "Dreamers" feel as they watch their fate being debated.

Today's Videos
Video Video: Extreme Rain Causes Deadly Mudslides in California

The mudslides have killed at least 13 people in a region devastated by fires last month.

Two baby bottle-nosed dolphins at a zoo in Duisburg, western Germany
Video Video: Dolphins Mug for Camera in Awareness Test

In a three-year study using mirrors, bottle-nosed dolphins were found to recognize themselves much earlier than other animals - even humans.

Video Video: Birth Control Your Own Adventure

How my side effects made me four different people

World
Friendship Bridge, linking Dandong, China, to North Korea. From the border city, the Chinese businesswoman Ma Xiaohong conducted trade that American officials say violated international sanctions.
Businesswoman's Fate a Test of China's Resolve on North Korea

By STEVEN LEE MYERS

The fate of Ma Xiaohong, and the business empire she built on trade with North Korea, has become a measure of China's willingness to confront its neighbor.

Women and their children in a chhaupadi hut in western Nepal in September. Nepal's government has been trying to discourage the chhaupadi tradition, in which menstruating women are banished from the home.
In Rural Nepal, Menstruation Taboo Claims Another Victim

By BHADRA SHARMA and JEFFREY GETTLEMAN

Many women in rural Nepal sleep outdoors when they are menstruating, because of a belief that they are impure. This week, one such woman died in the cold.

The former Auschwitz concentration camp, a legacy of Nazi Germany, is now a museum in Poland.
German Idea to Fight Anti-Semitism: Make Immigrants Tour Concentration Camps

By RICK GLADSTONE

Jewish advocacy groups welcomed an idea to make such tours mandatory for immigrants to Germany. But some experts called the idea simplistic.

For more world news, go to NYTimes.com/World
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U.S.
Emergency workers carrying a woman rescued in Montecito, Calif., on Tuesday.
A Rush to Find Survivors Amid the Mud of Southern California Enclave

By THOMAS FULLER

More than a dozen people are missing around Montecito in the aftermath of mudslides that killed 17 people and destroyed 100 homes.

An arrest at the border between San Diego and Tijuana, Mexico.
'Trump Effect' Wears Off as Migrants Resume Their Northward Push

By CAITLIN DICKERSON

The number of border crossings is on the rise as migrants and smugglers appear no longer deterred by the president's crackdown on illegal immigration.

Immigration and Customs Enforcement agents at a 7-Eleven in Los Angeles on Wednesday.
Immigration Agents Target 7-Eleven Stores in Push to Punish Employers

By PATRICIA MAZZEI

Agents visited 98 franchises around the country, arresting 21 people and demanding paperwork as they seek out employers who hire undocumented workers.

For more U.S. news, go to NYTimes.com/US
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Politics
At their peak, earmarks still represented only a sliver of the annual federal budget, but they were banned with a bipartisan bill in 2011. President Trump and members of Congress are now discussing bringing them back.
To Grease Wheels of Congress, Trump Suggests Bringing Back Pork

By ALAN RAPPEPORT

President Trump's suggestion that Congress revive the old practice of salting spending bills with lawmaker pet projects has revived a simmering debate.

Advocates for voting rights rallied outside the Supreme Court on Wednesday.
Supreme Court Weighs Purge of Ohio Voting Rolls

By ADAM LIPTAK

The justices considered whether states may cull their voting lists based on the failure to vote.

The hard-edge partisanship of Representative Darrell Issa, Republican of California, had begun to wear on a district that is affluent and increasingly moderate.
Darrell Issa, a California Republican, Will Not Seek Re-election to House

By NICHOLAS FANDOS

Mr. Issa becomes one of the most prominent in a long list of Republican retirements, adding to talk of a Democratic wave in the midterm elections.

For more political news, go to NYTimes.com/Politics
Business
The headquarters of the People's Bank of China in Beijing. Investors were rattled by a report that China's central bank, which owns $1.2 trillion in United States Treasury bills, may be poised to slow or even halt its buying of United States debt.
Investors Spooked at Specter of Central Banks Halting Bond-Buying Spree

By LANDON THOMAS Jr.

The most immediate fear: A sharp falloff in bond prices would rattle equity markets that are now trading at record highs.

Workers sorting lumber at a mill in Maple Ridge, British Columbia. Canadian lumber exports have become an increasing source of tension between the United States and Canada.
Canada Attacks U.S. Tariffs by Taking Case to World Trade Organization

By ANA SWANSON and IAN AUSTEN

A sweeping challenge to the Trump administration's "America First" policies could add to tensions already frayed by Nafta negotiations.

Gregory Abel, left, will become vice chairman of Berkshire Hathaway's non-insurance businesses, and Ajit Jain will serve as vice chairman of the conglomerate's insurance operations.
Warren Buffett's Succession Plan Is Down to Two

By MICHAEL J. de la MERCED

Warren Buffett's Berkshire Hathaway named Greg Abel and Ajit Jain as vice chairmen, clarifying the conglomerate's C.E.O. succession plan.

For more business news, go to NYTimes.com/Business
Technology
Peloton touts

State of the Art

What a $4,000 Treadmill Means for the Future of Gadgets

By FARHAD MANJOO

Peloton, which sells an internet-connected spin bicycle, unveiled a $4,000 internet-connected treadmill. The company's insight: The gadget is not as important as the service.

Gov. Kay Ivey congratulating Akio Toyoda, the chief executive of Toyota Motor, on Wednesday at an event announcing that Huntsville, Ala., had been chosen for a $1.6 billion plant to build cars for Toyota and Mazda.
Toyota and Mazda Choose Alabama for $1.6 Billion Car Plant

By NEAL E. BOUDETTE

The new plant is part of an initiative by Toyota to invest $10 billion in the United States over the next five years.

Interactive Feature Interactive Feature: You Asked About CES 2018. We Answered.

By BRIAN X. CHEN

At the giant International Consumer Electronics Show, thousands of tech companies are showcasing some of the hottest new innovations. Our lead consumer technology writer, Brian X. Chen, answered reader questions from the show in Las Vegas.

For more technology news, go to NYTimes.com/Technology
Sports
Ryom Tae-ok and Kim Ju-sik of North Korea performed in September.
North Korea Is in Winter Olympics Without Any Star Athletes

By VICTOR MATHER

Although nuclear tension may ease, it is unclear how many athletes will participate and they will probably struggle to win any medals.

Russian hackers released a new set of stolen emails on Wednesday, part of an effort to highlight disagreements between global sports officials and international doping regulators.
Russian Hackers Release Stolen Emails in New Effort to Undermine Doping Investigators

By REBECCA R. RUIZ

A group tied to Russia's main military intelligence unit published private emails Wednesday in an apparent attempt to retaliate against antidoping investigators.

The Mets brought back Jay Bruce, right, whom they traded to the Indians in August.
Jay Bruce Will Return to Mets on a 3-Year, $39 Million Deal

By JAMES WAGNER

Bruce was the most consistent power hitter in the Mets' lineup last season before he was traded to the Cleveland Indians in August.

For more sports news, go to NYTimes.com/Sports
Arts
President Trump arriving at Joint Base Andrews in Maryland for a trip to Nashville on Monday.

Books of The Times

Will Democracy Survive President Trump? Two New Books Aren't So Sure

By JENNIFER SZALAI

David Frum's "Trumpocracy" takes aim at the president and those who empower him, and "How Democracies Die," by Steven Levitsky and Daniel Ziblatt, reads at times like a sly subtweet of the Republican Party.

Evanna Lynch, left, and Colin Campbell as 17-year-olds on the loose in Enda Walsh's
Review: Dancing to Destruction in Enda Walsh's Fierce 'Disco Pigs'

By BEN BRANTLEY

This harrowing and exhilarating revival, featuring an inexhaustible cast of two, summons the agonies and ecstasies of being 17 in a blighted Irish town.

Charles Dutoit leading the Philadelphia Orchestra in 2012.
Charles Dutoit, Conductor Accused of Sexual Assault, Leaves Royal Philharmonic

By MICHAEL COOPER

The Swiss-born maestro will step down as the orchestra's artistic director and principal conductor after being accused of assaulting several women.

For more arts news, go to NYTimes.com/Arts
Movies
The actress Catherine Deneuve, one of the authors of a letter in Le Monde that says the #MeToo movement has gone too far.
Catherine Deneuve and Others Denounce the #MeToo Movement

By VALERIYA SAFRONOVA

In an open letter published in Le Monde, the actress and dozens of other Frenchwomen criticized the movement for punishing undeserving men.

Top YouTube stars like Logan Paul are known for pushing the envelope with outlandish behavior.
YouTube Drops Online Star Logan Paul From Premium Advertising

By DAISUKE WAKABAYASHI

The online service also suspended production of a movie with Mr. Paul a week after he posted a video of a dead body hanging from a tree in Japan.

Michelle Williams, Mark Wahlberg, right, and Maurizio Lombardi in
Purge of Kevin Spacey Gives 'All the Money in the World' a Pay Problem

By BROOKS BARNES

Mark Wahlberg received $1.5 million for reshoots of the kidnapping drama after it cut out the disgraced Spacey. Michelle Williams got just a small per diem.

For more arts news, go to NYTimes.com/Arts
New York
A condominium in Manhattan known as 200 Riverside Boulevard at Trump Place would like to remove the president's name from the front of its building.
'Trump Place' Asks if It Can Be Called by Any Other Name

By CHARLES V. BAGLI

The board of a Manhattan building bearing the president's name has asked a court to protect its right to remove it, without facing a lawsuit in return.

State Senator Jeffrey D. Klein has been accused by a former staffer of forcibly kissing her outside an Albany bar in 2015. He has denied the allegation.
Coalition Leader in State Senate Accused of Sexual Misconduct

By JESSE McKINLEY

A former staff member of State Senator Jeffrey D. Klein, who leads the Independent Democratic Conference, says he forcibly kissed her in 2015.

William Arroyo, 57, is among a handful of homeless men who stay overnight in the basement of a bodega in Brooklyn.
Down the Aisles, a Secret Shelter for the Homeless

By SARAH MASLIN NIR

For the last 14 years, a bodega owner in Brooklyn has quietly taken in the homeless, allowing them to stay in a crude shelter in the store's cellar.

For more New York news, go to NYTimes.com/NewYork
Media & Advertising
President Trump at a cabinet meeting on Wednesday, when he told reporters,
Trump Renews Pledge to 'Take a Strong Look' at Libel Laws

By MICHAEL M. GRYNBAUM

At a cabinet meeting, the return of the president as press critic, after his legal maneuvers against BuzzFeed and the publisher of Michael Wolff's book.

James Rosen, left, and Joel Achenbach. Mr. Rosen left Fox News in December, and Mr. Achenbach has been suspended from The Washington Post for 90 days.
2 Journalists, at Fox and Washington Post, Are Accused of Misconduct

By MAGGIE ASTOR

James Rosen, a Washington correspondent, left Fox News last month, and Joel Achenbach, a Washington Post reporter, received a 90-day suspension on Wednesday.

A Twitter campaign urged writers to pull articles they had sold to Harper's magazine as a way to protest an upcoming article about a list of men in the media accused of misconduct.
'Media Men' List Creator Outs Herself, Fearing She Would Be Named

By JACLYN PEISER

Word went out that an article would identify a creator of a list of media industry men accused of sexual harassment. Women urged writers to push back.

For more media and advertising news, go to NYTimes.com/Media
Fashion & Style
Rex Reed in his apartment in the Dakota in Manhattan.
Rex Reed Bangs a Gong on the Mediocrity of Modern Life

By ALEX WILLIAMS

The tirelessly acidic film critic recalls when screens were silver, not small; when actors were stars, not celebrities; and when written opinion wasn't free.

Attendees worked side by side during a Quilt co-working day, hosted by Puno Lauren Puno, the founder of the online marketplace I Love Creatives, at her home in downtown Los Angeles.
Come on Over to My Place, Sister Girlfriend, and We'll Co-Work

By SHEILA MARIKAR

Quilt, a start-up in Los Angeles, links women who want to schmooze, study and surf the internet - all in the comfort of another's home, for a fee.

Topshop's new Fake News jeans.

Unbuttoned

Fake News Jeans: Travesty or Sign of Our Era?

By VANESSA FRIEDMAN

Topshop, the British retailer, has made the issue into a slogan on a pair of pants. Cue controversy.

For more fashion news, go to NYTimes.com/Fashion
Obituaries
Brig. Gen. Hays received the Distinguished Service Medal from Gen. William C. Westmoreland, the Army chief of staff, in 1971.
Anna Mae Hays, 97, U.S. Military's First Female General, Dies

By SAM ROBERTS

She served on the front lines during World War II and Korea and, as chief of the Army Nurse Corps, sought to contain casualties in Vietnam.

Dr. James Melius speaking at a legislative conference in Albany in 2016.
Dr. James Melius, Advocate for Workers' Health, Dies at 69

By RICHARD SANDOMIR

His expertise was essential to the creation of the law that authorized billions to help those whose health was affected by the 9/11 terrorist attacks.

Prime Minister Odvar Nordli of Norway with President Jimmy Carter on a visit to the White House in June 1979.
Odvar Nordli, a Cold War Leader of Norway, Dies at 90

By SAM ROBERTS

As a Labor prime minister, he pressed a social-democratic agenda. But he resigned under fire for letting the U.S. stockpile weapons near the Soviet border.

Donnelly Rhodes, seated left, with other members of the cast of
Donnelly Rhodes, Prolific Character Actor, Is Dead at 81

By DANIEL E. SLOTNIK

Mr. Rhodes's numerous roles included a dimwitted escaped convict on "Soap" and a brusque doctor on the reboot of "Battlestar Galactica."

Denise LaSalle, Singer and Writer of Earthy Songs, Dies at 78

By JON PARELES

Ms. LaSalle had a career that lasted almost half a century and reached the top of the R&B charts in 1971 with "Trapped by a Thing Called Love."

For more obituaries, go to NYTimes.com/Obituaries
Editorial

Editorial

Is Mr. Trump Nuts?

By THE EDITORIAL BOARD

It's the wrong question. Efforts to diagnose the president from afar are damaging to real efforts to address his unfitness.

A billboard showing President Vladimir Putin and President Trump in Montenegro.

Editorial

Who Will Listen to Democrats' Warning on Russia?

By THE EDITORIAL BOARD

In the face of Republican complacency, Senate Democrats issue the most comprehensive public analysis thus far of Moscow's war on the West.

Greg Schiller on Wednesday outside his home in Elgin, Ill.

Editorial

When Mercy Collides With the Law

By THE EDITORIAL BOARD

An Illinois man got into trouble with local officials after he let homeless people stay in his basement on the coldest nights.

For more opinion, go to NYTimes.com/Opinion
Op-Ed
President Trump during a bipartisan meeting with members of Congress on Tuesday.

Op-Ed Columnist

Caution: Entering Trump's Mind

By GAIL COLLINS

Half of him is feeling very bipartisan these days.

Op-Ed Contributor

The Battle Line for Western Values Runs Through Poland

By CHARLES A. KUPCHAN

If the European Union confronts the populist, nationalist government in Warsaw, it can prove that it stands for something.

Palestinian roommates in the film

Op-Ed Contributor

Where Can Women Make Movies? The Middle East

By NANA ASFOUR

"In Between," the new film by Maysaloun Hamoud, is the latest in a long line of feminist films by female Arab directors.

Ambulance workers were able to reivive the 40-year-old woman shown here after she overdosed on opioids in November.

Op-Ed Contributor

How to Fight the Opioid Crisis

By DAVID A. KESSLER

A new cabinet officer could pull together the vast but uncoordinated resources of the federal government to address the problem head on.

For more opinion, go to NYTimes.com/Opinion

ON THIS DAY

On Jan. 11, 1935, aviator Amelia Earhart began a trip from Honolulu to Oakland, Calif., becoming the first woman to fly solo across the Pacific Ocean.