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Recode

Apple and Google's exposure notification tool has a tough road ahead

Email sent: May 21, 2020 9:10am

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Apple and Google's coronavirus exposure tool, limited Twitter replies, and Occupy Democrats
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Apple and Google roll out their new exposure notification tool. Interest seems limited.

The Apple-Google coronavirus exposure notification tool is one step closer to being launched. The two companies released software that will help public health authorities build apps that incorporate their exposure notification tool. Apple, specifically, rolled out a software update to iOS devices that some users could download immediately. This big public unveiling raises a couple of important questions: Will any government agencies actually build those apps? And will anybody use them?

These questions remain unanswered. They also raise another, more essential question: How will the new Apple-Google tool help the world fight the coronavirus pandemic? The companies sold the concept early on as part of a tech-based solution to a very difficult problem. But now, Apple and Google admit the tool is not meant to be a silver bullet.

Yet, there is progress. Recode's Sara Morrison reports that following the late April release of a beta version of the technology, Apple and Google announced on Wednesday that the application programming interface (API) for its exposure notification tool is now being released to public health authorities. According to the companies, several countries and three US states — Alabama, North Dakota, and South Carolina — will base their digital contact tracing apps on the tool.

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How immigrant twin brothers are beating Trump’s team on Facebook

Occupy Democrats, a Facebook page that Rafael and Omar Rivero started eight years ago, has emerged as a counterweight to right-wing meme machines.

[ Nick Corasaniti / New York Times ]

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Twitter is testing a way to let you limit replies to your tweets

It's available now to 'a limited group of people globally.'

[ Jay Peters / The Verge ]

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As the world hopes for a COVID-19 vaccine, anti-vaxxers are growing their social media influence

Social media analysis reveals a big spike in engagement on anti-vaxxer pages and accounts in the coronavirus pandemic.

[ Cameron Wilson / BuzzFeed News ]

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The inescapable pressure of being a woman on Zoom

Why are women bemoaning their hair, clothing choices, and more, even during a pandemic?

[ Leslie Goldman / Vox ]

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Coronavirus layoffs remake Silicon Valley job market

Layoffs at Uber, others send thousands searching for new tech-industry opportunities

[ Asa Fitch / Wall Street Journal ]

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The real story behind Rosie the Riveter

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