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The Economist Fr

A special edition on the coronavirus pandemic

Email sent: Sep 26, 2020 7:15am
Our cover editorial this week starts with the depressing prospect of the global recorded deaths from covid-19 surpassing 1m. That represents a terrible amount of suffering. But the statistics contain good news as well as bad.
The Economist

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September 26TH 2020

The Economist this week

Our coverage of the coronavirus

Welcome to the newsletter highlighting The Economist’s best writing on the pandemic.

Our cover editorial this week starts with the depressing prospect of the global recorded deaths from covid-19 surpassing 1m. That represents a terrible amount of suffering. Try to bear three things in mind, however. The statistics contain good news as well as bad. Treatments and medicines are making covid-19 less deadly. And societies have the tools to control the disease today. It is here, in the basics of public health, where too many governments are still failing their people. Covid-19 will remain a threat for months, possibly years. They must do better.

In the rest of our writing on covid-19 we have a briefing on the state of the pandemic, including our own modelling of the true rates of infection and death, as well as an assessment of forthcoming medicines and vaccines. We report on how the disease has aggravated the hardship of the world’s poorest people. Our sister magazine, 1843, has a photo-essay by André François, with words by Sarah Maslin, our Brazil correspondent, about covid-19 among indigenous families living on the outskirts of Manaus, deep in the Amazon rainforest. We look at Britain’s latest attempt to suppress the spread of the virus, the misery in Syria and how pandemic bailouts for companies could end up creating corporate zombies.

Our mortality tracker uses the gap between the total number of people who have died from any cause and the historical average for the time of year to estimate how many deaths from the virus the official statistics are failing to pick up.

We have also been covering the pandemic in Economist Radio and Economist Films. Babbage, our podcast on science and technology, asks what scientists still need to understand about covid-19, and how Taiwan managed to cope with the virus so successfully.

Infections are climbing in Europe and America. The cold weather to come will bring people indoors, accelerating the spread of the disease. I hope our coverage prepares you for what lies ahead.

Zanny Minton Beddoes
Editor-In-Chief

Editor’s picks

Must-reads from our recent coverage







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