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First hearing on Trump's controversial church photo op

Email sent: Jun 29, 2020 7:21am

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Congressional hearing on what happened ahead of Trump's church visit, Texas hearing on changes to sex education curriculum and more news you need to know Monday. ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌  ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌  ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌  ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ 
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Daily Briefing
 
Monday, June 29
In this Monday, June 1, 2020 file photo, President Donald Trump holds a Bible as he visits outside St. John's Church across Lafayette Park from the White House.
Monday's Daily Briefing: Trump's church visit aftermath, Texas sex ed
Congressional hearing on what happened ahead of Trump's church visit, Texas hearing on changes to sex education curriculum and more news you need to know Monday.

Happy Monday, Daily Briefing readers. Let's kick this week off with a quick recap of the biggest news you missed this weekend:

The world surpassed 10 million confirmed coronavirus cases and 500,000 deaths in just seven months, according to the Johns Hopkins University data dashboard, with one quarter of all cases coming from the United States.
President Donald Trump denied knowledge of an intelligence report that concluded Russia had paid a bounty to the Taliban to kill American troops serving in Afghanistan.
A man, Tyler Gerth, was killed in a shooting at Jefferson Square Park on Saturday night in Louisville, Kentucky — the site of the ongoing demonstrations against the death of Breonna Taylor.
At least two people are dead, including the suspect, and four are injured after a shooting at a northern California Walmart distribution center, authorities confirmed.

It's N'dea and here's what you need to know as you start your week.

Coronavirus cases rise across the country

As confirmed global coronavirus cases reached a new global milestone over the weekend, New York state reported just five coronavirus deaths, which is the lowest seen since March 15, Gov. Andrew Cuomo said.

Several other states, however, are showing the opposite trend. New confirmed cases are on the rise in 36 states, according to CNN. California Gov. Gavin Newsom announced Sunday that he is ordering bars in certain counties to close, while recommending closures in others.

Here are the latest headlines on COVID-19:

'This is hell': Parents and kids hate online classes. Going back to school likely will include more of it
COVID-19 may be linked to brain complications, study finds. But does it cause them?
'I have a breathing problem,' yells maskless Trader Joe's shopper who was kicked out of store in viral video
Stores, bars and restaurants weigh whether to open or close as COVID-19 cases rise
More than 500,000 people worldwide have now died from the coronavirus

Texas prepares for showdown over sex ed in schools

For the first time in two decades, the Texas State Board of Education is slated to make changes to its sex education curriculum , triggering a likely showdown between conservative and liberal state activists. The last revisions to the health education standards were in 1997, and much of the debate is expected to revolve around issues of contraception, sexual orientation and gender identity. Curriculum work groups made up of school officials, teachers and health experts began drafting revisions to the standards last September. The state board will hold its first public hearing on the matter Monday with a final vote on the changes in November. 

What reopened schools will look like: Scheduled days home, more online learning, lots of hand-washing

First hearing on clearing of peaceful protesters before Trump's church photo op 

Members of Congress will hold a hearing Monday on the forcible clearing of peaceful protesters  before President Donald Trump's controversial walk to St. John's Church for a photo opportunity. On June 1, protesters were removed from a nearby park using chemical irritants, rubber bullets, shields and horses,  before Trump walked across the street from the White House to pose with a Bible in front of the historic church along with members of his administration. The forcible clearing of peaceful protesters drew wide condemnation. The Democrat-led committee said the hearing will focus on determining what happened, whether excessive force was used, and what policy options are available. 

Former Trump Defense Secretary James Mattis: The event was a 'bizarre photo op'
'I am outraged': DC bishop denounces Trump's church visit after police clear protesters with tear gas

Many Americans say it would be 'inappropriate' for either party to dispute election 🗳️

 A majority of Americans say they would find it inappropriate  if the November election's outcome was disputed in a variety of ways, a new study released Monday finds. About two-thirds of Americans (67%) believe it would be inappropriate if President Donald Trump loses but refuses to leave office because he claims he has credible evidence of illegal voting, according to a report from the Democracy Fund Voter Study Group. Over the past several weeks, Trump has claimed, without evidence, that the election is rigged, specifically taking aim at the many states looking to expand mail-in voting due to the coronavirus pandemic. Many experts have disputed his claim.

Where do Americans stand on election issues? Let them tell you
Election 2020: Biden and Trump each warn that other side may 'steal' the election as fight over mail voting rages
No presidential winner on election night? Mail-in ballots could put outcome in doubt for weeks

More news you need to know

Millions of Americans think they’re safe from flood waters. They aren’t
Chase checking account balance off? Bank says 'technical issue' was to blame
5 things you missed at the 2020 BET Awards, from Black Lives Matter tributes to Beyoncé reigning
Shaquille O'Neal and Papa John's Pizza launch Shaq-a-Roni Pizza with company's largest slices
Fireworks sales are booming nationwide. Will sparklers sell out before Independence Day?
Opinion: Cam Newton-New England Patriots union could be a match made in heaven

New report finds gap between Black and white homeownership 🏠

Among Black families, 44% owned their own home as of the first quarter of this year compared to 73.7% of white families, according to Monday's new U.S. Census report .  And that disparity is even greater depending on the city, according to an analysis of census data by the national real estate brokerage Redfin. Black families experienced a slight uptick in homeownership in the past year, inching up from 41.1% during the first quarter of 2019. But that progress is threatened by the coronavirus pandemic which is disproportionately affecting both the physical and financial health of Black Americans.

More headlines on race in America:

'Indefensible': Trump slammed for sharing video where supporter yells 'white power' at protesters
Mississippi lawmakers overwhelmingly pass bill to create new state flag without Confederate battle emblem
Princeton removes Woodrow Wilson's name from school, citing his 'racist thinking and policies'
USA TODAY poll: Americans want major police reform, more focus on serious crime
Facebook, social media under more pressure from brands over hate speech

Flight testing for Boeing's grounded 737 Max expected to begin ✈️

Flight-certification testing for Boeing's 737 Max, which has been grounded since March 2019 because of two deadly crashes, could begin as early as Monday , according to a Federal Aviation Administration email sent Sunday to congressional oversight committees. The company needs clearance from the FAA before the planes can fly again, and the test flights, with FAA test pilots, are a key step. They would take several days and would evaluate Boeing’s proposed changes to the automated flight control system on the Max. The flight control system, triggered by faulty readings from sensors, pushed the planes into nosedives that led to crashes in Indonesia and Ethiopia, killing 346 people.

In better news: Here's a (nearly $90,000) tip 💰

A GoFundMe campaign for a San Diego Starbucks barista has raised more than $89,000 after a customer's Facebook post went viral.

In a Facebook post June 22, Amber Lynn Gilles posted a photo of a barista named Lenin Gutierrez and says he refused her service for not wearing a mask. Many jumped to Gutierrez's defense and debated the use of masks. 

San Diego started requiring masks or face coverings May 1 and the state of California added the requirement June 18.

Matt Cowan, of Irvine, California, doesn't know Gutierrez but started the virtual tip jar Tuesday with a GoFundMe campaign titled "Tips for Lenin Standing Up To A San Diego Karen." The initial goal was to raise $1,000.

Gutierrez posted a Facebook video Wednesday to share his side of what happened and said as an aspiring dancer the GoFundMe will help him pursue his dreams.

“Thank you for all the love and support. It’s been so helpful and so shocking to see something get so big that only happened within a few minutes," he said in the video where he outlined the incident.

 
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